What to Expect from COVID-19 Vaccine If You Have a Chronic Condition | #phishing | #scams | #phishing scams


Share on Pinterest
If you have an autoimmune disorder, talk with a physician about what to expect from a COVID-19 vaccine. Jacob Lund/Getty Images
  • People with autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatic or neuroinflammatory diseases, have expressed concern that the COVID-19 vaccines could aggravate their symptoms.
  • Health experts widely believe the benefits of the vaccine outweigh the risks of a potential reaction or flare-up.
  • People may need to work with their physician to adjust the timing of their medications around their vaccination.

Many patients with autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatic or neuroinflammatory diseases, have expressed concern that the COVID-19 vaccines could aggravate their symptoms or trigger a flare-up.

The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) believes the benefits of the vaccine outweigh the risks of a potential reaction or flare-up, considering how people with chronic conditions face an increased risk of a severe form of COVID-19 and hospitalization.

The ACR recently released recommendations for patients with autoimmune diseases who are concerned about how they may react to the vaccines.

The recommendations explain how certain immunocompromised people may need to work with a doctor who can adjust the timing of their medications to improve the efficacy of the vaccines.

“Vaccine side effects have more to do with an individual’s immune system and the reaction of that individual’s immune system to the vaccine than their chronic disease state,” said Dr. Ramin Ahmadi, the chief medical officer for Graduate Medical Education Global LLC.

The vaccines haven’t been widely tested in people with autoimmune conditions, so the data regarding their safety and efficacy of the vaccines in this group is limited.

People who are immunosuppressed, such as those on chemotherapy or people who have had a bone marrow transplant, may mount a less robust immune response, compared with the general population, but the vaccine is believed to still provide protection.

Health experts widely believe the benefits of being vaccinated outweigh the risks, since people with chronic conditions typically have a higher risk of a severe form of the disease.

Patients with autoimmune and inflammatory rheumatic diseases face a higher risk of hospitalization from COVID-19.

Every person will react differently to the vaccines.

“What’s important to keep in mind is that all diseases of the immune system were not created equally. Some may impact the development of vaccine-mediated immunity, and some stand to benefit a great deal from the vaccine,” Ahmadi said.

Many patients with autoimmune conditions fear the vaccine could trigger a flare-up.

“There may be a risk of a flare-up after the COVID vaccination in some individuals with severe disease,” said Ahmadi, noting this risk is theoretical.

But the benefits of being vaccinated against COVID-19 far outweigh any risks, experts say.

Though the data on the COVID-19 vaccines in immunocompromised individuals is limited, past research on other vaccines has shown that vaccination rarely causes adverse events in patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic disease.

A recent study published in The Lancet Rheumatology says that given this past data, the theoretical potential for an adverse event to occur shouldn’t be a reason to advise patients with autoimmune disorders against vaccination, especially when they are at an increased risk of a severe form of COVID-19.

Dr. David Cutler, a family medicine physician at Providence Saint John’s Health Center in Santa Monica, California, says getting vaccinated during a flare-up is generally OK.

Because steroid medications can suppress the immune system, it’s often advised that people taking such medications avoid them for 2 weeks before or after vaccination, says Cutler.

That said, you definitely don’t want to delay getting vaccinated against COVID-19, so talk with your doctor about the timing of your medications and disease state prior to vaccination.

Some of the side effects that occur after vaccination, such as fever, muscle aches and pain, and fatigue, may resemble symptoms related to an underlying condition.

The reactions can also be localized. For example, some people may develop lymph gland enlargement after vaccination, says Cutler.

“These reactions are generally mild, short-lived, and self-limited,” Cutler said.

Cutler says it’s OK to take Tylenol or ibuprofen for pain or Benadryl for itching after the vaccine if need be.

“The most important thing is getting the COVID vaccine as soon as you become eligible because this will reduce your chance of getting COVID, transmitting COVID, or experiencing any of the long-term effects of even asymptomatic COVID infection,” Cutler said.

Many patients with autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatic or neuroinflammatory diseases, have expressed concern that the COVID-19 vaccines could aggravate their symptoms or trigger a flare-up.

Health experts widely believe the benefits of the vaccine outweigh the risks of a potential reaction or flare-up, since immunocompromised people have an increased risk of a severe form of COVID-19.

People may need to work with their physician to adjust the timing of their medications around their vaccination.



Original Source link

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

47 + = 53