| Super Mario Bros or Apple stock? | #iphone | #ios | #mobilesecurity


Wanna hear something disgusting? A vintage copy of Super Mario Bros. on the NES was just sold at auction for $114,000.

Admittedly, it’s one of the most influential games ever (it introduces Mario to the world) and the specific copy was given a 9.4 grading, which means it’s in near-perfect condition. Oh, and there’s some weird technicality about a cardboard hanger tag that makes it super rare. But still… $114,000?

This got me thinking — how good of an investment would it have been buying a copy of Super Mario Bros. and leaving it somewhere safe for 20-odd years? Well, I’m going to find out.

After a bit of consideration, I decided that the best thing to compare it to is Apple stock. The Cupertino company has been the darling of investors for years now, with Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway owning $91.3 billion of it, making up 43% of its portfolio.

So, let’s find out which would’ve been a better investment.

I couldn’t find a specific US release date, but Super Mario Bros. was launched in Japan on September 13, 1985 — so I’m going to use this date.

After a bit of digging, I found the rough price range of NES games from a print issue of Electronic Games Monthly:

Now, as Super Mario Bros. was a flagship title, let’s just assume that it was one of the most expensive games on the NES. That means it would’ve had a retail cost of $49.99.

Next? Well, we need to find out how much Apple stock cost on September 13, 1985. Which I did:

Apple Stock 1985 super mario bros

It closed at $0.281250 on that day, meaning $49.99 worth of it would leave us with 177.74 Apple stocks. 

Not bad at all.

In terms of dates, the $114,000 copy of Super Mario Bros. sold on July 10, 2020. At close on the same day, a single Apple stock was worth $383.679993.

This means your 177.74 Apple stocks were worth $68,196.14 last Friday. Oof.

Yep, the mint condition copy of Super Mario Bros. is worth $45,803.86 more than all those sweet, delicious stocks.

But don’t tear up your investment portfolio just yet (I know how close you were), as this is a bit of a blip for two reasons: one, the rarity of this specific copy of the game and two, stock splits.

Let’s look at the rarity first.

A bit of browsing on Price Charting shows that even an unopened copy of Super Mario Bros. normally only goes for, on average, $298.26.

super mario bros new price chart