Scammers pose as Powerball winners | #phishing | #scams


Most scams are total lies. Every detail that you’re told is false.But there’s a scam that may catch you off guard because part of the story is true, and the names mentioned are real.A viewer forwarded a scam text to News 8 On Your Side.It claims to be from Mr. and Mrs. Tammy and Cliff Webster, the Powerball winners of $316.3 million in Wisconsin on Jan. 5, 2022.It goes on to say the couple is donating $120,000 to 50 random individuals, and the recipient is one of them. There’s a number to call to collect the money.It’s true that Tammy and Cliff Webster of Oneida, Wisconsin, did win a $316 million Powerball jackpot in January. If you did an internet search on this couple, you would find this information and think the message is legitimate.But some victims from around the country who have followed the instructions to get the funds have reported losing hundreds and sometimes thousands of dollars for “processing fees.”Others have reported giving up personal information, like a driver’s license number or Social Security number, to get the money.This kind of scam has been circulating for years.When someone finally does win the big Mega Millions jackpot, you can bet that scammers will update and recycle their pitch with the names of the latest winners.

Most scams are total lies. Every detail that you’re told is false.

But there’s a scam that may catch you off guard because part of the story is true, and the names mentioned are real.

A viewer forwarded a scam text to News 8 On Your Side.

It claims to be from Mr. and Mrs. Tammy and Cliff Webster, the Powerball winners of $316.3 million in Wisconsin on Jan. 5, 2022.

It goes on to say the couple is donating $120,000 to 50 random individuals, and the recipient is one of them. There’s a number to call to collect the money.

It’s true that Tammy and Cliff Webster of Oneida, Wisconsin, did win a $316 million Powerball jackpot in January. If you did an internet search on this couple, you would find this information and think the message is legitimate.

But some victims from around the country who have followed the instructions to get the funds have reported losing hundreds and sometimes thousands of dollars for “processing fees.”

Others have reported giving up personal information, like a driver’s license number or Social Security number, to get the money.

This kind of scam has been circulating for years.

When someone finally does win the big Mega Millions jackpot, you can bet that scammers will update and recycle their pitch with the names of the latest winners.



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