Russian hackers target EUROVISION: Fears grow over threat to sabotage Ukraine’s entry | #cybersecurity | #cyberattack


Russian cyber hackers could target the Eurovision song contest to stop Ukraine from winning the accolade. 

Killnet, a pro-Putin group, is suggesting that it will immobilise online voting servers, over support for Ukrainian entry Kalush Orchestra.

The folk-rap group have becoming increasingly popular across Europe following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine in February. Russia has been banned from the competition. 

Kalush Orchestra have becoming increasingly popular across Europe following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine in February. Pictured at the Turin semi-finals on Tuesday

In a post on Telegram featuring a Eurovision logo, Killnet wrote: ‘You can’t vote online.

‘Perhaps our DDOS attack is to blame for everything,’ it said, The Sun reported.

On Tuesday, Kalush Orchestra soared through the competition’s semi-final, held in Turin, Italy. 

Oleh Psiuk, the group’s founding member, said that winning the competition ‘increase morale’ in Ukraine. 

‘For our country it is so important to have victories in all ways,’ he added. 

Their song, Stefania, features the line: ‘I will always walk to you by broken roads’ — and has become even more significant following the months of destruction in Ukraine by Russian forces.

Killnet, a pro-Putin group, is suggesting that it will immobilise Eurovision's online voting servers

Killnet, a pro-Putin group, is suggesting that it will immobilise Eurovision’s online voting servers

‘Every year the Eurovision Song Contest voting system has a wide range of security measures in place to protect the audience participation from outside influences,’ said a spokesperson for Eurovision.

‘This year is no different.’

Last night, Killnet posted a message saying that another attack is  ‘not worth the time’, the Sun reported.

It comes after Pro-Russian hackers attacked the websites of several Italian institutions, including the senate, ANSA news agency reported on Wednesday.

Killnet claimed the attack, ANSA said, which also targeted the National Health Institute (ISS) and the Automobile Club d’Italia, a national drivers’ association.

The websites of the senate, Italy’s upper house of parliament, and the ISS were back online at 8pm (6pm GMT). An hour earlier, it had been impossible to access them.

Senate speaker Elisabetta Casellati said on Twitter that the hacker attack had not caused any damage.

‘These are serious incidents, which should not be underestimated,’ she wrote.

The defence ministry, whose website was not available, said in a statement this was ‘due to long-planned maintenance activities ongoing on the website’.

Senate speaker Elisabetta Casellati said on Twitter that the hacker attack had not caused any damage

Senate speaker Elisabetta Casellati said on Twitter that the hacker attack had not caused any damage 

A source at the Italian cyber security agency said they were working with the affected administrations to restore the websites, suggesting ‘the first appropriate technical countermeasures’.

Police said an investigation was ongoing, but made no further comment.

Since Russia’s invasion of Ukraine on February 24, many Western governments have raised alert levels in anticipation of possible cyber attacks on IT systems and infrastructure.

In late March, Italian railway company Ferrovie dello Stato Italiane (FS) temporarily halted some ticket sale services fearing it had been targeted by a cyber attack.

In April, the ecology transition ministry said it had to shut down all its IT systems due to external threats. 



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