Anonymous claims it has successfully carried out new cyberattack on Russian government websites | #government | #hacking | #cyberattack


Anonymous claims they have taken action against Russia once again by targeting their government websites in another attack against of Putin and his invasion of Ukraine.

The group of hacktivists took to Twitter to announce the websites they had successfully brought down, including FSB, the Russian intelligence service.

Using the military term ‘Tango down’, which says an enemy has been defeated in combat, alongside screenshots as proof of their take-down, the organisation listed four websites that they hacked into.

Moscow.ru, Analytical Center for the Government of the Russian Federation and the Ministry of Sport of the Russian Federation, and Russia’s Federal Security Service (FSB), which is the main successor agency of the Soviet Union’s KGB, were all taken over by Anonymous. 

Anonymous also leaked private correspondence between Vladimir Putin and Russian defence minister Sergei Shoigu, outlining plans to cut down Ukrainian forests and sell onwards. 

Anonymous claims they have taken action against Russia once again by targeting their government websites, in another attack against of Putin’s invasion of Ukraine and the censorship of Kremlin-controlled media

The letter, shown in a subsequent tweet, is allegedly from minister Shoigu, and reads: ‘Dear Vladimir… In order to create fortifications to provide formations, military units of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation involved in a special military operation, felling is required on defence lands and other categories, followed by the use of the resulting wood by the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation.’

It went on to read that the funds will be used ‘in the interests of defence’.  

The hacker collective signed off their series of tweets today with a Russian expletive to the President: ‘Blyat Putin!’ 

Last week, Anonymous hacked into Russia’s media censorship agency and released 340,000 files from Roskomnadzor federal agency, stealing classified documents which they then passed on to transparency organisation Distributed Denial of Secrets (DDoSecrets), who published them online.

The trove of 820 gigabytes of emails and attachments, some of which are dated as late as March 5, show how the Kremlin is censoring anything referring to their brutal invasion of Ukraine, which Moscow is instead calling a ‘special military operation’.

The group of hacktivists took to Twitter to announce the websites they had successfully brought down, including FSB, the Russian intelligence service. They also leaked private correspondence between Vladimir Putin and Russian defence minister Sergei Shoigu, outlining plans to cut down Ukrainian forests and sell onwards

The group of hacktivists took to Twitter to announce the websites they had successfully brought down, including FSB, the Russian intelligence service. They also leaked private correspondence between Vladimir Putin and Russian defence minister Sergei Shoigu, outlining plans to cut down Ukrainian forests and sell onwards

The Anonymous hacker said they ‘urgently felt the Russian people should have access to information about their government’, DDoSecrets said.  

The files relate to the Russian republic of Bashkortostan, one of the largest in the federation with a population of four million.

Roskomnadzor, which oversees mass media in Russia, restricted access to Facebook and Twitter before blocking them and also threatened to cut off access to Wikipedia, due to its article on the invasion.

On February 24, the agency ordered all media outlets to only use official, state-sanctioned information sources or face severe punishment for spreading ‘fake news’. 

The words ‘war, ‘invasion’ and ‘attack’ were all banned from use when describing Russia’s military actions in Ukraine. 

The media regulator has also edited its profile on the Telegram messenger to capitalise the Z in the agency’s name after it became a symbol of the Russian invasion.  

The Daily Mail, Mail on Sunday and MailOnline UKRAINE REFUGEE APPEAL

Readers of Mail Newspapers and MailOnline have always shown immense generosity at times of crisis.

Calling upon that human spirit, we are now launching an appeal to raise money for refugees from Ukraine.

For, surely, no one can fail to be moved by the heartbreaking images and stories of families – mostly women, children, the infirm and elderly – fleeing from Russia’s invading armed forces.

As this tally of misery increases over the coming days and months, these innocent victims of a tyrant will require accommodation, schools and medical support.

All donations to the Mail Ukraine Appeal will be distributed to charities and aid organisations providing such essential services.

In the name of charity and compassion, we urge all our readers to give swiftly and generously.

TO MAKE A DONATION ONLINE 

Donate at www.mailforcecharity.co.uk/donate 

To add Gift Aid to a donation – even one already made – complete an online form found here: mymail.co.uk/ukraine

Via bank transfer, please use these details:

Account name: Mail Force Charity

Account number: 48867365

Sort code: 60-00-01

TO MAKE A DONATION VIA CHEQUE

Make your cheque payable to ‘Mail Force’ and post it to: Mail Newspapers Ukraine Appeal, GFM, 42 Phoenix Court, Hawkins Road, Colchester, Essex CO2 8JY

TO MAKE A DONATION FROM THE US

US readers can donate to the appeal via a bank transfer to Associated Newspapers or by sending checks to dailymail.com HQ at 51 Astor Place (9th floor), New York, NY 10003

Over the past decade, the censor has demanded that US companies including Google remove content on Ukrainian protests, Forbes reported. 

The leader and cofounder of DDoSecrets is Emma Best, a US-based leaker who has previously targeted Russian government agencies and US police forces in the wake of George Floyd protests.  

David Betz, professor of war in the modern world at King’s College London, said: ‘I think it’s positive. Censors should be exposed.’

It is feared Russia could be cut off from the global internet any time from today, and the hackers hope the data will be widely shared in the country beforehand, exposing the censorship at the top of government.  

A letter from Andrei Chernenko, Russia’s deputy digital minister, is calling on Russian state-owned websites and portals to ramp up security by today.

He ordered them to move to domestic services and remove JavaScript code downloaded from foreign sources.

The minister also instructed web services to switch to domain name system (DNS) servers on Russian soil.

The global DNS allows people around the world to use the internet easily and freely, indicating Russia could cut itself off from the system and implement its own. 

Russia claims the directive is only to enhance security in the face of repeated cyber attacks, but experts fear it is a sign Russia could disconnect itself from the global internet.

Mikhail Klimarev, director of the Internet Protection Society, said: ‘From the outside it looks like a preparation for the sovereign Runet.’ 

Earlier last week, Anonymous claimed to have hacked into Russian state TV to air footage of the war in Ukraine, as well as hacking into  Russian media sites, replacing pages with a ‘tombstone’ in honour of the war dead.

The hacking collective said it targeted Russia 24, Channel One and Moscow 24 to show the realities of the savage invasion.

The hackers said they are taking part in the ‘biggest Anonymous op ever seen’ in their ‘take-down of Russia’. 

Part of the footage aired on Russian TV included the message: ‘ordinary Russians are against the war’ and urged them to oppose the invasion.

Anonymous also claimed to have shut down Russia’s space agency so Putin ‘no longer has control over spy satellites’ two weeks ago.

This comes after reports that Chinese telecoms giant Huawei ‘rushed to Russia’s aid’ to fend off Western cyberattacks.   

Reports in China say the tech giant, which has several offices in the UK, has been helping Putin’s efforts to stabilise Russia’s internet network.  

A report, which appeared on a Chinese news site but was later deleted, claimed that Huawei would use its research centres to train ‘50,000 technical experts in Russia’.

It added that the firm expects to expand ‘to cutting-edge fields such as artificial intelligence, cloud computing, and face recognition’. 

‘If Russia thought for one moment China would break rank they wouldn’t have invaded Ukraine.’

Chinese companies are in fear of secondary sanctions from the US if they are found to be helping Russian companies evade the measures.

Huawei has been badly hit by US sanctions, introduced in 2019 over national security fears, and has been banned from providing equipment for the UK’s 5G network.

A spokesperson for Huawei said: ‘This story is untrue and based on inaccurate and false information from an article that has since been corrected.’ 



Original Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

thirty six + = 40