A peek inside 1930s Art Deco home that is one of just two left | #government | #hacking | #cyberattack


A rare Art Deco house from the 1930s has been listed as a Grade II property – and is just one of two left of its kind in the country. 10 Dorchester Drive, Herne Hill, London, is a “remarkably well-preserved 1930s modern house” that hopes to give new owners an affordable slice of modern living.

The beautiful home was built in 1935-6 by two local builders, Cyril and Stanley Morrell, in collaboration with architects Leslie Kemp and Frederick Tasker. The house is based on the architects’ winning design for the Daily Mail Ideal Home Exhibition in 1934, which was exhibited in a setting titled ‘Village of Tomorrow’.

It is just one of two known examples to have been built in the UK.

A spokesperson from Historic England said: “This is a remarkable survival, which transports us back to the architectural ideals of the 1930s where ‘dignified simplicity’ was favoured over excessive ornamentation. The significance of this building has now been recognised and any future change can be managed effectively, so that it can function as a modern home and retain its special character.”

The property, that remains relatively untouched, was owned by the same family for more than 60 years until it was recently sold. It sits in a small group of significant 20th century properties – with two other homes just opposite, Dorchester Court and Dorchester House, that are already Grade II listed.

The house is based on the architects’ winning design for the Daily Mail Ideal Home Exhibition in 1934

The home is just one of two left of its kind in the country
The home is just one of two left of its kind in the country

Just earlier this year, in February, the quirky art deco house was saved from demolition following intervention from C20 Society and the use of a Building Preservation Notice (BPN). The house design was originally marketed as one that could be built anywhere with customisable design features – aiming to offer clients on a modest budget an affordable slice of modern living.

Some of its surviving original features include a ‘sun-trap’ bay window and the ‘luxurious’ bathroom with separate shower – and its planning design allows for the ground-floor rooms to be opened out into one long entertainment space.





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